Sex-Ed Facts

Many people said we are saying “no” to sex education, it’s not true! We are saying “no” to the IRRESPONSIBLE sex education!
It has been argued that Ontario is in urgent need of updating its Sex Ed curriculum, to allow our children to survive the 21st century.
However the statistics shows the opposite. Sex Education is failing our young people. In 2004, New Brunswick implemented Sex Ed, yet teen pregnancy rate was up 40% from 2006 to 2010, while Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) was up by 38%.
Alberta also has a similar Sex-Ed in place. Her Teenage STI rates are way above the national average; sharp increase of sexual assault cases has been reported after the introduction.
New Jersey, a State that has CSE since 1980, it ranks 5th among 46 states with long-term name-based reporting in the rate of HIV (not AIDS) infection among adults and adolescents in 2010.
These numbers are telling us that comprehensive Sex Ed is not working, not the kind of Sex Ed that claims to be value-free, pleasure oriented, and ideologically driven.
In the 21st century, we need a value-based, science-based sex education program that works, that can protect our children from harms.
First, Sex Ed should be taught in the context of a value system that values love, respect and trust.
In “Teach Your Child the Three Biggest Sex Words: Love, Respect, and Trust”, Dr. Kaeser wrote "Accessing sexual pleasure has taken precedence over anything remotely resembling emotional connectedness, and we need to seriously consider this consequence as it pertains to children's learning about sexuality and their potential involvement in sexual risk behaviors. "
Unfortunately, none of these three BIG words are included in this update sex-ed curriculum.
Second, the science of health should be taught to our children comprehensively, rather than selectively to legitimate certain ideology. Central Disease Control states: “Abstinence and sexual intercourse with one mutually faithful uninfected partner are the only totally effective prevention strategies(of STI/HIV transmission).”
However, in the curriculum, this important information about the health benefits of long term committed monogamous relationship is not adequately presented. Similarly, the high health risks associated with anal intercourse, the negative physical and psychological impact of teen sex, and the severe consequences of HIV are not adequately addressed.
As Dr. Fred mentioned: “Along with teaching our kids about sexual decisions and making good choices, we also need to spend much more time instilling in them an awareness of the values that are essential for establishing a sexual relationship that is as risk free as is possible.”
We cannot afford to let our children to pay the price for this government's mistake in implementing an ineffective and ideology driven sex education curriculum. Therefore, we want the Ministry of Education to stop the implementation of this Sex Education Curriculum 2015 and launch an open consultation to all Ontarians.

References:
[1]Fred Kaeser, Ed.D., the former director of health for the NYC Department of Education. “Teach Your Child the Three Biggest Sex Words: Love, Respect, and Trust”. Accessing sexual pleasure has taken precedence over anything remotely resembling emotional connectedness, and we need to seriously consider this consequence as it pertains to children's learning about sexuality and their potential involvement in sexual risk behaviors. (The three biggest sex words: love, respect, and trust. Post published by Fred Kaeser Ed.D. on Sep 27, 2011 in What Your Child Needs To Know About Sex (And When) )
[2]According to Alberta Health and Wellness STI action plan, released in 2011, it was reported that STI rates had increased by 207% from 1999 to 2009. It is highest among people aged 15 to 25; 72% of STI in Alberta between 2004 and 2009 were in people younger than 25 years of age. (Is Alberta the STI Capital of Canada?, March 21, 2013,By Grace Scott http://www.vice.com/en_ca/read/is-alberta-the-sti-capital-of-canada
[3]Dr. Jonathan Zimmerman, Professor of Education and History of University of New York stated: “we don’t have strong evidence that it consistently reduces teen pregnancy or venereal disease rates.”